Road Injuries Is One of the 10 Most Causes of Death for Adolescents in Africa

Modes: road
Topics: road safety

The World Health Organization currently released an article about the top ten causes of death for adolescents. One of the most causes of death are road traffic injuries, which are even ranked before deaths caused by HIV/ AIDS. In 2013, more ten-to-nineteen-year-olds were killed by road injuries than any other disease on the African continent.

Due to the rising motorization in low and middle-income countries and the fact that improvements in road safety are not keeping pace with the increase of traffic, this development is leading to more traffic accidents annually.

In Mexico, the fourth most common cause of death for adolescents are accidents. Deaths caused by road Injuries are even higher in China where it is ranked as third reason causing the most deaths. This number gets only outranked by Thailand where most of the adolescents are dying because of road injuries. In Namibia, road injuries are also the third most common death, next to HIV/AIDS and Malaria, even though, Namibia has one of the best roads in southern Africa and one of the lowest population.

These numbers are alarming and show the relevance of road safety in the cooperation with developing countries. GIZ on behalf of the German Government already implements road safety projects in some countries to reduce traffic death and increase road safety. In Namibia, GIZ implements together with the Ministry of Works and Transport and the National Road Safety Council an improved road safety management legislation, the development of road safety measures based on comprehensive data analysis and other activities to develop safe transport infrastructure and to educate road users. Moreover, road safety is a vital issue for Transport 4 People as we believe a sustainable transport system is a safe transport system.

For further information, please contact michael.engelskirchen@giz.de.

Sources: http://allafrica.com/stories/201602051449.html?aa_source=nwsltr-latest-en

http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2481809

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/2015/GSRRS2015_Summary_EN_final2.pdf?ua=1

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/2013/report/factsheet_afro.pdf